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We are excited to offer some of our herbal goodies to you at a discounted price! We hope you enjoy this month’s specials! We thank you for your support and send our warmest wishes!

Cultivated without Chemicals & Kosher Certified

Rhodiola Root, North American

Rhodiola Root, North American1 lb. – $27.95

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Overview

The floral scented rhodiola root, used for thousands of years in Europe and Asia, has just recently been introduced to the U.S. Traditionally; one of its main uses in the Himalayas was for occasional altitude related ailments.

North American Rhodiola: Our North American Rhodiola is coming from one of the few cultivated varieties in the world. It is grown and tended in soil free from chemicals and pesticides and is in accordance with the Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Herbal Raw Materials (GACP). The GACP ensures herbal raw material will be correctly identified, non-adulterated, has accurate representation regarding the quality of the product, and is sustainably harvested.

Chinese Rhodiola: Rhodiola from China is the most prevalent material on the market. Our organic Chinese Rhodiola is wild harvested from organically certified lands. The sustainability of harvesting this plant from sensitive habitats is increasingly becoming a concern. Because of this China has stepped up its efforts to limit the harvest and sale of the plant in order to protect the plant and the ecosystem. We are still bringing in small amounts of this material when we can, but are focusing our purchasing power on moving towards the cultivated North American Rhodiola.

Botany

Rhodiola rosea is only one of 90 Rhodiola species (55 of which are found in China,5 and 30 of which can be found in Tibet)6 all of which resemble sedum (Sedum sp.), the popular garden ornamental, and are members of the Crassulaceae family.1 Both of these genera are often referred to as ‘stonecrops’ due to their ability to survive in dry rocky areas. Many different species are used traditionally and somewhat interchangeably.6 The following have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) R. crenulata, R. sacra, R. algida, R. dumulosa, R. henyri, R. rosea, R. yunnanensis, R. kirilowii, R. sachalinensis.6 R. rosea is a perennial that prefers arid sandy soil and grows at very high altitudes, particularly in the arctic areas of Europe and Asia.2

Rhodiola grows in North America as well, in Canada and in the United States. In the U.S. it is native to eastern Maine and southern Vermont (although in Vermont it is considered extremely rare and threatened),7 and introduced to Connecticut,3 Alaska, Maine, New York, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina, and can possibly be found in mountainous regions in several other states.1 This species has a fragrant rose smelling rhizome, hence the name of the specific name ‘rosea.’2 The generic name refers to its fragrance as well, and is derived from the Greek ‘rhodon’, which also means ‘rose’.8

Cultivation And Harvesting

R. rosea may grow up to 20 years before being harvested in the wild. Popularity of this herbal supplement has led to overharvesting in the wild in recent years.9 Several states and countries are avidly working to protect this species from extinction by classifying it as endangered.9 Thus, globally, a high demand for commercially cultivated R. rosea is underway.

History And Folklore

The use of Rhodiola for medicinal purposes dates back to the time of the Greek physician, Dioscorides, who documented its use in 77 C.E. In his medical text De Materia Medica, he referred to it as ‘rodia riza’, Linnaeus eventually extrapolated its Latin binomial from this term.2 It has been used in folk medicine for more than a thousand years with some of its first recorded uses being in Tibet and China.6 It was originally utilized in Tibet, where at least 30 different Rhodiola species are found and where some of the towns boast an altitude of over 10,000 feet.9 Villagers in the mountainous regions of Siberia gift a bouquet of rhodiola root as a good luck charm to couples before their marriage ceremony with wishes of fertility and happy children.2 In Asia, a tea of rhodiola was considered to be helpful, especially in winter months.2

The harvesting and preparation of rhodiola, referred to as ‘golden root,’ was a well-kept family secret in these regions for generations. In Siberia it was taken, in secret to the Caucasian Mountains where it was traded for a variety of goods including wine and honey. In ancient times, emperors from China used the rhodiola from Siberia for medicinal purposes.2 In TCM, this root was considered to be a plant which nourished chi (energy or vital force) and encouraged circulation.6

This adaptogenic herb has been used as folk medicine for centuries used in Russia, Scandinavia, and in many other countries.2 Rhodiola was employed in Russia to boost the stamina of Olympic athletes and was even taken by cosmonauts to support physical and mental performance.9 The scientific literature from Sweden, Norway, France, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Iceland has supported the efficacy of rhodiola as far back as 1725 and continues to do so.2 Since 1960, more than 180 research studies have investigated rhodiola’s properties particularly as an adaptogen.2 However, it has only become popular recently in the West, possibly due to the fact that historically, most of the studies were published in languages other than English.2

Flavor Notes And Energetics

Sweet and slightly bitter taste. Energetically cold to slightly warm.6,10
Its flavor is sweet and bitter, and energetically it is believed to be a cold herb. However, it is sometimes listed as ‘slightly warm,’ and some deliberation on this is most likely related to the variance in species similar to the variance in the energetics of various types of ginseng.

Herbal Actions

Adaptogenic, astringent

Uses And Preparations

Dried root as a tea, tincture, or powdered and encapsulated.
Fresh root as a tea or tincture.

Constituents

Monoterpene alcohols and their glycosides, cyanogenic glycosides, aryl glycosides, phenylethanoids, phenylpropanoids and their glycosides, flavonoids, flavonlignans, proanthocyanidins and gallic acid derivatives.4

Precautions

Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

Cloves Whole

Cloves Whole1 ib. – $16.80

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Overview

An extensively utilized culinary spice since ancient times, clove rivals other well-known spices such as cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg for popularity. Clove is used in liqueurs and mulled wine, perfumes and even love potions. More recently, clove oil has been employed for its analgesic effects in dentistry.4-7

Botany

Clove is a small evergreen tree with smooth gray bark and large, bright green, aromatic and lanceolate shaped leaves. The flowers grow in yellow to bright red clusters at the end of branches.8 It is in the Myrtaceae family, with relatives ranging from guava to allspice to eucalyptus.1 The clove of commerce is the pink or reddish flower bud that turns dark brown when dried.4 The entire tree is highly aromatic8 and its Latin specific name aromaticum, refers to this intense aroma. The generic name Syzygium is based on the Greek word ‘syzygos’, that means ‘paired or joined’ and is in reference to the petals which are joined.3 The common name ‘clove,’ a derivative of the Latin ‘clavus’ meaning ‘nail,’ and refers to the shape of the clove.2,3 Clove is native to the Maluku or Molucca Islands (often referred to as the Spice Islands, due, in part, to the abundance of clove) in Indonesia.1

Cultivation And Harvesting

Clove is widely cultivated in Tanzania, Indonesia, Madagascar, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and South America9 with Tanzania being the largest commercial cultivator.9,10 Zanzibar and the Island of Pemba, both parts of Tanzania, were once represented by a flag with two clove buds representing the influence of this spice in the region.3

History And Folklore

Clove has been utilized as a culinary spice for thousands of years. It is believed that spice found in a ceramic pot in Syria dating to around 1,700 BCE may have been clove.11 Also, trade between the Molucca Islands, where the clove grows natively, and China goes back at least to some 2500 years ago.3 During the Han dynasty, it was customary for court officials to hold cloves in their mouths to freshen their breath while addressing the emperor.3 Clove was initially brought to Europe in the 4th century by Arab spice traders3,8 and by the 16th and 17th centuries, the Portuguese were attempting to hold onto the monopoly that they had on the clove spice trade.11 However, the Dutch East India Company (referred to in Dutch as the Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie or ‘VOC’) gained control in the early 17th century. According to Jack Turner in his book Spice: The History of a Temptation: “After the final expulsion of the Portuguese in 1605, the VOC set about making each and every clove on Earth a Dutch possession.”11Turner also went on to infer that the Dutch guarded the clove “as ever a jealous lover watched his sweetheart” because apparently there was quite a lot to gain.11 The markup on clove was nearly 2,000 percent, and further, to maintain such artificially high prices, often hundreds of thousands of pounds of spices were set aflame in huge bonfires.11 Eventually, a Frenchman named Pierre Poivre, started stealing the highly guarded seedlings and sending them to French colonies in the tropics, making it possible for other countries to grow this crop and, thus, ending the monopoly of the VOC.10,11 In the early 1800’s the British got involved and began to establish plantations in Tanzania which has grown into the largest clove exporter.10

Traditionally, in the Molucca Islands, a clove tree was planted each time a child was born leading to the abundance of the this spice.11 Various folk tales and myths surround clove as it was believed to be imbued with the magical powers of protection, love, and, burned as incense to attract financial abundance.12 Further, it was thought that burning it as incense would stop others from gossiping about you. Additionally, it was used in exorcisms to expel evil spirits.12

Used extensively in Middle Eastern, north African, Chinese (in their ‘5 spice powder’) and Indian cuisine.3 It is also indispensable in ‘chai,’ a spicy Indian tea which also contains cardamom, cinnamon, ginger, black peppercorn and black tea and also in garam masala, an Indian culinary spice used in curries, containing turmeric and a variety of other spices.3 The strong flavor of cloves isn’t as appreciated in other countries and is mainly used as a flavoring in various baked goods such as gingerbread.3 Interestingly, cloves are not used much for cooking in their native homeland of the Molucca Islands, but rather are extremely popular as cigarettes.3 In Ayurveda (system of traditional healing in India), clove, referred to as ‘lavanga,’ has not only been used in the kitchen, but has been employed as a medicinal herb to support digestion, soothe nausea, to support lung health, and is thought to be a highly effective carminative. It is considered to be an energetically hot herb having a pungent taste and therefore most useful in cold or stagnant conditions.2 Likewise in TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine), clove is considered a warming herb that breaks up stagnant energy by encouraging chi (energy) flow, and is used to support the kidney, spleen, and stomach meridians.13

The main component in the volatile oil is eugenol6 (cinnamon also contains high levels of this constituent)14 thought to be responsible for clove’s analgesic effects.

Flavor Notes And Energetics

Highly aromatic and pungent.2 Heating.2,13

Herbal Actions

Topical anesthetic, carminative

Uses And Preparations

Dried flower buds whole or powdered as a culinary spice, as part of a tea blend, or as an essential oil.
Occasionally dried leaf is used as well

Constituents

Clove bud oil contains between 80–90% eugenol and also contains eugenyl acetate, b-caryophyllene, methylsalicylate, methyleugenol, campesterol, carbohydrates, kaempferol, lipids, oleanolic acid, rhamnetin, sitosterol, stigmasterol and vitamins.6

Precautions

Specific: Consumption should not exceed small amounts for use as a spice. Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner before using in therapeutic doses.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

Certified Organic & Kosher Certified

Orange Peel

Orange Peel1 lb. – $9.00

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Introduction

Peels from any member of the Sweet Orange family have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine at least since the writing of the Divine Husbandman’s Classic of the Materia Medica, written in the second century BC. The little known fact is that there are substantially more enzymes, flavonoids, and phyto-nutrients in the peel of the Orange rather than the fruit. The peel is where all the essential components accumulate and they may be found in three main sections of the peel; the flavedo, albedo, and oil sacs.

It is believed that the Sweet Orange has its origins in China and from here it has been cultivated in virtually every country across the globe with most of the current production coming from Florida, California and parts of the Mediterranean.

Constituents

Vitamin C, Vitamin B1, Choline, Folic Acid, over 60 known flavonoids, d-limonene, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, aldehydes, numerous minerals and vitamins.

Parts Used

The peel of the fruit picked at its ripe stage and then dried.

Typical Preparations

The cut peel is traditionally used as a tea, and the powdered peel is used to add a sweet, fizzy flavor to drinks. Many cosmetics call for peel in either cut form or as a powder. Its light flavor makes it easy to add into tea blends, and the peel can also be incorporated into jams, jellies, stir-fry dishes and many other culinary creations.

Precautions

Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

Certified Organic & Kosher Certified

Spinach Powder

Spinach Powder1 lb. – $10.80

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Introduction

Although Spinach is usually thought of as a food product, it can also be used medicinally and for its nutritional properties. It is excellent source of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Constituents

The leaves contain Protein, Iron, Fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Sodium, Folic Acid, Manganese, Calcium, Phosphorus, Sodium, Beta-carotene, Potassium, Thiamine, Riboflavin, Carotenoids, Niacin, Chlorophyll, Antioxidants, Lutein, Phytochemicals, and Lipoic acid.

Parts Used

Seeds, leaf, and the above ground parts of the plant.

Typical Preparations

Powdered Spinach may be added to smoothies, stir fries, soups, casseroles, salad dressings, or other dishes. It can be encapsulated, and 1-2 capsules may be taken 1-2 times each day with water at mealtimes.

Summary

Spinach contains a plethora of nutritional and medicinal properties which help to strengthen our immune system, boost energy levels, and it provides our bodies with necessary vitamins and minerals.

Precautions

Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

Veggie Mix

Veggie Mix1 lb. – $12.75

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This crunchy savory mix of vegetables and spices makes the perfect addition to your favorite soup or stir-fry. Some may prefer to snack on it as is, or add it to sour cream to make a tasty dip for fresh veggies or chips.
Contains: organic Leek, organic onion, organic Onion toasted, and organic bell Peppers. Salt-free

Certified Organic & Kosher Certified

Vita-Blend Tea

Vita-Blend Tea4 oz. – $5.53

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Overview

A delicious healthy blend formulated with botanicals known to help support general well-being. This herbalicious infusion has just the right balance of nutrients to keep you going. Great as part of a morning routine or enjoy a cup in the afternoon for a little boost of goodness.

Taste

A well-polished taste with hints of cranberry and citrus.

Aroma

An initial zest from the hibiscus with a soft linger.

Brewed color and time

Cranberry. 3-4 minutes

Caffeine content

Caffeine free

Ingredients

Organic Hibiscus flowers, organic Peppermint leaf, organic Lemongrass, organic Red Clover herb, organic Nettle leaf, organic Alfalfa leaf, organic Oatstraw, and organic Horsetail.

Visit: https://mauldinfamily1.wordpress.com/2015/10/20/new-and-featured-aromatherapy-products/ to view more new and featured products.

Debra Mauldin, Certified Aromatherapist

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